Video tutorial on how to install XPenology 5.2 on ESXi

I made a YouTube tutorial of my XPenology guide

Since my XPenology guide has become incredible popular I decided to make a YouTube video of it. Hopefully this will make it easier to understand, especially for new users.

This is one of my first videos so it’s far from perfect, but I think it’s a reasonable good start. If you would like to see more XPenology and Synology related videos please like my video and subscribe to my channel!

 

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4 comments, add yours.

kkOH

I know you run this on esxi but becasue of my situation I need to keep microsoft as the bare metal installation in my house so I’m fiddling with Oracle’s latest iteration of VirtualBox. I’ve fiddled around a good bit to get it working and it’s performance is loads better than the cruddy D-Link NAS I’ve been using. So the main question I have is regarding virtual discs. My main function will be the family file share which could result in anywhere from 0 to 6 people simultaneously listening to music, viewing photos, or watching video that’s stored on the NAS. Should I take the time to spread out 3 Flat vDiscs or is the performance negligible to the auto-expanding types that hypervisors?

Thanks,
KKoh

Benjamin Krause

Benjamin Krause

Author

First of all, if you want to stick with Microsoft you could always use Hyper-V instead of VirtualBox. Are you asking about thin provisioning vs fat provisioning? I think the most important is still to get yourself a RAID controller and configure a proper RAID for best performance and stability. If you intend to use virtual disks then I would just place them on a RAID 10 or similar.Apart from that I don’t think you’ll have any performance issues anyway unless you start with read/write intensive operations.

kkOH

Yes I am talking thin vs thick. I have three physical hard drives on the metal and as for the read/write stuff… the most intense might be two or three separate clients trying to stream video from the VM at the same time while someone is sitting at the main computer using it for email/web surfing or perhaps light web based kids games.

As for HyperV, is it free and will it run on Win7/10 pro? I’m familiar with esxi and vBox which is why in this case I went with vBox. I’d be willing to try HyperV out just for the experience assuming it doesn’t need a server grade msOS.

Benjamin Krause

Benjamin Krause

Author

I doubt it wouldn’t matter if you choose thin or thick provisioning. Personally I would probably use thick, just because it has slightly better performance. However, that choice is based on my personal opinion, you most likely won’t notice the difference.

Yes, Hyper-V is free and it’s included with Windows 8 and up. It’s also possible to install it on Windows 7, but I haven’t tried that myself. Bare in mind that your hardware must support virtualization/SLAT for Hyper-V to work: http://www.howtogeek.com/73318/how-to-check-if-your-cpu-supports-second-level-address-translation-slat/

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